Week 34 -- "When your date doesn’t hear the word “NO”: Sexual assault and date rape" -- Grade 10

Week 34 -- "When your date doesn’t hear the word “NO”: Sexual assault and date rape" -- Grade 10

Suite360 Student Lesson Name: When your date doesn’t hear the word “NO”: Sexual assault and date rape.


Brief Summary: Finding out your child has been sexually assaulted or is being sexually abused is something no parent wants to hear. It’s hard to know just how to react or even how to feel. You may feel angry, anxious, sadness, shock, and fear. It is important to keep in mind that there is no one “right” reaction, and that all reactions and responses are normal. Your child is counting on you for support. That means finding a way to work through your feelings and reactions so that they don’t interfere with your child’s welfare. Sometimes your child may not tell you because they are ashamed, they are afraid you might overreact, or because they are scared. As a parent, how do you know if your child has experienced sexual abuse? What are the signs to look for? The video provided will give information on sexual abuse and what you should look for as a parent.


Shared vocabulary: None


Key Takeaways:

  • Sexual assault is defined as any “nonconsensual sexual contact involving force upon a person without consent.” Penetration does not have to occur with sexual assault. It can include unwanted touching or fondling.
  • Sexual assault is considered rape when it involves oral, anal, or vaginal penetration. Penetration may be by a body part or an object.
  • Rape is not about sex or passion. It is an act of control, aggression, and violence.
  • What happened was not your fault your child’s fault. No one "asks for it" because of the clothes they wear or the way they act. The fault lies solely on the shoulders of the perpetrator.
  • It is important for your child to resist the urge to shower and needs to Immediately go to the nearest rape crisis center or hospital where they need to request a SANE exam (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner). The nurse can provide the treatment and care for your child, including the morning-after pill and testing for HIV and STDs. 
  • Immediately report the incident to law enforcement. Your child needs to file a police report in person and once it’s filed, make sure to get a copy. 


Continue the Conversation:

  • What is consent?  How does this play a role in any relationship?
  • Secrets don’t make friends, so they say, so why is it important to have open honest communication about how you feel and what you want?
  • Why is it important to have a “buddy” when at a party or an unfamiliar situation?
  • What steps would you take if you find yourself in an unwanted or unsafe situation?
  • How can you respect all people in a healthy and safe way?  Why is this important?




Additional resources/suggested reading: